Sons of Damien

 
         
Home

Contents

Serials Home

407RCAF

Squadrons

Survivors


Avro Manchester/Lancaster Serials

Glossary

 

Abbreviations

 

AAEE - Aircraft Armament Experimental Establishment

AFDU - Air Fighting Development Unit

AFEE - Airborne Forces Experimental Establishment

AGS - Air Gunners School (1 AGS = RAF Pembrey 2AGS = RAF Dalcross 3 AGS = RAF Castle Kennedy from June1941 to Dec 1942 then moved to RAF Mona then back to Castle Kennedy10/43, 4 AGS = RAF Morpeth, 7 AGS =
Stormy Down 8 AGS = Evanton 9AGS = Llandwrog 10AGS = Castle Kennedy (moved to Barrow - date not known)
11 AGS = Andreas, Isle of Man (moved to Jurby - date not known ) 12 AGS = Bishop's Court)

AOS - Air Observers School

APDU - Air Photography Development Unit

BCFU - Bomber Command Film Unit

BCIS - Bomber Command Instructors School

BDU - Bombing Development Unit

BLEU -Blind Landing Experimental Unit

CFE - Central Photographic Establishment

CFS - Central Flying School

CGS - Central Gunnery School

CNU - Central Navigation School

CSE - Central Signals Establishment

CU - Conversion Unit

EANS - Empire Air Navigation School

ECDU - Electronic Countermeasures Development Unit

ECFS - Empire Central Flying School

ETPS - Empire Test Pilots School

G-H Training Flight

HCU - Heavy Conversion Unit

LFS - Lancaster Finishing School

MPRD - Metal and Produce Recovery Depot

MU - Maintenance Unit

OTU - Operational Training Unit (24OTU formed at RAF Honeybourne, 25OTU formed from 106 Sq C Flt based at RAF Finningly, 26OTU formed at RAF Wing, 27OTU formed at RAF Lichfield, 28OTU formed at RAF Wymeswold, 29OTU formed at RAF North Luffenham, 30OTU formed at RAF Hixon, 31OTU formed at Debert, Canada, 32OTU formed at RAF West Kirkby, 34OTU formed at Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, 36OTU formed at Greenwood, Nova Scotia)

PFNTU - Pathfinder Force Navigation Training Unit

RAE - Royal Aircraft/Aerospace Establishment

SOC - Struck Off Charge

S of TT - or STT -School of Technical Training (1 S of TT = RAF Halton 2S of TT = Cosford (Flight mechanic & Engines), 4S of TT = RAF St. Athan 5 S of TT =RAF Locking)

SS - Sold for Scrap

TDU - Tactical Development Unit

TFU - Telecommunications Flying Unit - Defford 1941-57

No.1 Ferry Unit

No.16 Ferry Unit

 

Manchester/Lancaster Operators

 

Squadrons, Units and codes of Manchester operators during World War II (9 Squadrons):

Royal Air Force.

9 (KA/WS); 49 (EA); 50 (QX); 61 (QR); 83 (QQ/OL); 97 (OF); 106 (ZN); 207 (EM); 408 (EQ); 1654HCU (UG/JF); 1656HCU (EK/BL); 1660HCU (TV/YW); 1661HCU (GP/KB); 1668HCU (J9/2K).

 

Squadrons, Units and codes of Lancaster operators during World War II (62 Squadrons):

Royal Air Force.

7 (MG/XU); 9 (WS); 12 (PH/GZ); 15 (LS/DJ); 35 (TL); 44 (KM); 49 (EA); 50 (VN); 57 (DX/QT); 61 (QR); 75 (AA/JN); 83 (OL); 90 (WP/XY); 97 (OF/ZT); 100 (HW/FZ); 101 (SR/MW); 103 (PM); 106 (ZN); 109 (H5); 115 (KO/IL/A4); 138 (NF/AC); 149 (OJ/TK); 150 (IQ/JN); 153 (P4); 156 (GT); 166 (AS); 170 (TC); 186 (XY); 189 (CA); 195 (A4/JE); 207 (EM); 218 (HA/XH); 227 (9J); 300 (BH); 514 (A2/JI); 550 (BQ); 576 (UL); 582 (6O); 617 (AJ/YZ/KL); 619 (PG); 622 (GI); 625 (CF); 626 (UM); 630 (LE); 635 (F2).

Royal Canadian Air Force.

405 (LQ); 408 (EQ); 419 (VR); 420 (PT); 424 (QB); 425 (KW); 426 (OW); 427 (ZL); 428 (NA); 429 (AL); 431 (SE); 432 (QO); 433 (BM); 434 (IP/WL).

Royal Australian Air Force.

460 (UV/AR); 463 (JO); 467 (PO).

 

Lancaster Survivors

Out of a total production of 7377 aircraft of all marks only 26 survive in various states from wreckage to airworthy examples. These are listed below.

 

R5868

FM159 KB941 NX622
W4783 FM212 KB944 NX664
W4964 FM213 KB976 NX665
DV372 KB839 KB994 PA474
FM104 KB848 KB999 RA502
FM118 KB882 NF920  
FM136 KB889 NX611  

 

Lancaster B I R5868

Built as part of a batch of 100 Manchesters ordered from Metropolitan Vickers in 1939 but built as a Lancaster B I. Issued to 83 squadron as OL-Q then to 467 squadron as PO-S this aircraft completed 137 operational sorties. Originally "Q-Queenie" of No. 83 Squadron, R5868 logged 79 sorties (the first against Wilhelmshaven on 8th/9th July 1942, the 79th against Milan on 12th/13th August 1943) before joining No. 467 Squadron in November 1943, and becoming "S-Sugar". It resumed operations on 26th/27th November with a sortie against Berlin, and logged its 100th operation on 11th/12th May 1944, when the target was Bourg Leopold in Belgium. Its last operational sortie - to Flensburg on 23rd April 1945-was disappointingly anticlimactic: owing to 10/10 cloud no bombs were dropped. After the war "S-Sugar" was selected by the Air Ministry for preservation. It was transferred to RAF Wroughton where it was from 1947 to 1958. It was the gate guard at RAF Scampton from 1958 until 1970. It was then transferred to RAF Bicester where it was restored between 1970 and 1972. On March 20th 1972 the aircraft was placed on display at the RAF Museum Hendon as PO-S, where it remains to the present day.

 

Lancaster B I W4783

Built as part of an order of 200 Lancasters ordered from Metropolitan Vickers in 1940 and built as 170 Mk I with Merlin Mk20 engines and 30 Mk III with Merlin 28 engines. The aircraft was issued to 460 squadron as AR-G on 22nd October 1942 as A66-2. It flew 90 missions between December 6th 1942 to April 20th 1944. Delivered to RAAF in Australia as A66-2, October 1944. The aircraft was accepted at Amberly, Queensland. Declared surplus in July 1945 it was stored in Canberra. It has been at the Australian War Memorial, Canberra since 1960 and has undergone recent restoration and is still on display.

Lancaster B 1 W4964

Built as part of an order of 200 Lancasters ordered from Metropolitan Vickers in 1940 and built as 170 Mk I with Merlin Mk20 engines and 30 Mk III with Merlin 28 engines. Delivered to 9 squadron as WS-J between April 1943 and October 1944. This aircraft completed 106 operational sorties before being reduced to a maintenance airframe becoming 4922M. It was struck off charge in November 1949. Remains of the Mid-fuselage section are on public display at the Newark Air Museum, Newark, England.

Lancaster B I DV372

Part of the third production batch of 200 aircraft ordered from Metropolitan-Vickers Ltd., Trafford Park, Manchester, England. Built under contract number B69275/40 and covered by Works Order Number GO 122196. Serial numbers of this batch included DV155-DV202, DV217-DV247, DV263-DV312, DV324-DV345 and DV359-DV407. Of this order 91 aircraft were completed as Mark I's whilst the remainder were completed as Mark III's. Delivery commenced May 1943 and was completed in November 1943 (average rate of production being 8 aircraft per week). Delivered to 467 squadron as PO-F in November 1943 it also served with 1651  CU from November 1944. The aircraft was wrecked on 4th October 1945. Fuselage noted in Vendair hanger, Croydon, May 1958. Cockpit section is currently on public display at the Imperial War Museum, London, England.


 

Lancaster B X FM104

This aircraft was built as part of the second production batch of 130 aircraft ordered from Victory Aircraft Limited, Malton, Ontario, Canada. Serial numbers of this batch included FM100-FM229. Aircraft were equipped with Packard built Rolls-Royce Merlin 22, 38 or 224 engines. It was delivered to the UK in January 1945. Stored at Maintenance Unit awaiting assignment to a squadron then subsequently returned to Canada for RCAF in June 1945. Post war it was modified to Mk.X Maritime Reconnaissance, No. 10 Rescue Unit. The aircraft was brought on charge for the RCAF and finally struck off charge on September 10th 1964. It was placed on display atop a pole in the Canadian National Exhibition Grounds, Toronto, Ontario where it remained until 1999.

It was dismantled and removed and is currently under restoration for display. The aircraft is owned by the City of Toronto. 

Lancaster B X FM118

This aircraft was built as part of the second production batch of 130 aircraft ordered from Victory Aircraft Limited, Malton, Ontario, Canada. Serial numbers of this batch included FM100-FM229. Aircraft were equipped with Packard built Rolls-Royce Merlin 22, 38 or 224 engines. It was flown to the UK in April 1945. Stored at No32 Maintenance Unit awaiting assignment to a squadron then subsequently returned to Canada for RCAF in June 1945. The aircraft was struck off charge 22nd March 1948. The derelict hulk of the aircraft was recovered from the RCAF Gunnery Range.

The majority of the fuselage is in storage at the Nanton Lancaster Society Air Museum, Nanton, Alberta, Canada. Whilst other surviving pieces can also be found in storage with the BCATP Museum, Brandon, Manitoba, Canada. The cockpit section was sent to Toronto Air Museum to help with the restoration of FM104.

Lancaster B X FM136

This aircraft was built as part of the second production batch of 130 aircraft ordered from Victory Aircraft Limited, Malton, Ontario, Canada. Serial numbers of this batch included FM100-FM229. Aircraft were equipped with Packard built Rolls-Royce Merlin 22, 38 or 224 engines. It was flown to the UK in April 1945. Stored at No32 Maintenance Unit awaiting assignment to a squadron then subsequently returned to Canada for RCAF in June 1945.

Post War the aircraft was modified to Mk. X Maritime Reconnaissance and served with No407 Squadron (RX-136). The aircraft was struck off charge on 10th Aril 1961 it had the civilian registration CF-NJQ reserved but this was not taken up. It was displayed atop a pole from 1961 until 1990 as VH-N (later NA-P) at the Centennial Planetarium, Calgary, Alberta. It was removed from its pole in April 1992 and displayed as FM136/NA-P. It is currently on Public display at the Calgary Aero Space Museum, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

Lancaster B X FM159

This aircraft was built as part of the second production batch of 130 aircraft ordered from Victory Aircraft Limited, Malton, Ontario, Canada. Serial numbers of this batch included FM100-FM229. Aircraft were equipped with Packard built Rolls-Royce Merlin 22, 38 or 224 engines. It was flown to the UK in May 1945. Stored at No32 Maintenance Unit awaiting assignment to a squadron then subsequently returned to Canada for RCAF in September 1945 in preparation for “Tiger Force” operations in the Pacific. With the end of the second world war the aircraft was flown to storage at Fort Macleod, Alberta to await a decision on her future. Do to her very low airframe hours, she was reactivated with the RCAF in 1953 and was flown out to Ontario that same year to undergo conversion into a Maritime Patrol Aircraft. Initially Taken on strength with 103 Rescue unit based out of Greenwood Nova Scotia and later with 407 Squadron based out of Comox British Columbia, she served her squadrons well until 1959 when she was flown to Vulcan for disposal.

Three local Gentlemen from Nanton Alberta decided that an aircraft would make a fitting memorial to the aircrews killed in action as well as becoming a tourist attraction. After hearing that there were Lancaster's being destroyed at Vulcan, George White contacted Crown Assets to inquire as to the possibility of acquiring a "Lanc" for display. With the help of Fred Garrett and Howie Armstrong, Lancaster FM159 was purchased from Vulcan and towed across farmers fields and up onto the highway to the town of Nanton. Over the years, vandals and the weather started to take their toll on the aircraft despite the efforts of local service clubs and individuals.

In 1986 a group calling themselves The Nanton Lancaster Society was formed to better look after the bomber and its future. When a windstorm tore the port elevator from the tail, the decision was made to begin fundraising for construction of a building to house the aircraft. With donations from thousands of people worldwide and loans from the Province and the town, a building was completed in 1991 and the aircraft was finally rolled indoors where restoration to ground running condition is underway.

In 1991, the Nanton Lancaster Society dedicated Lancaster FM159 to Ian Bazelgette V.C 635 Squadron. The aircraft now carries the markings of his aircraft F2-T.

FM159 Restoration Project - www.lancasterfm159.freeservers.com. 

Lancaster B X FM212

First flown by test pilot Don Rogers in Aug.45; TOS 21.8.46 in the RCAF; placed in storage until Apr.48; then was the prototype for converting to Mk.10P by Avro Canada; served with #9 and #418 squadrons with code 'VC-APA' ; later was reissued to #408(P) Sqdn, Air Transport Command as code 'MN212' serving until 1962 having a total 8100 hrs; flown into storage on 11.3.64 at RCAF Stn. Dunnville, Ont. SOC 9.10.64. Sold to the city of Windsor for the sum of $1250 for a memorial. Brought across Lake Erie to Windsor, Ont. by barge, assembled in Dieppe Park until placed on a plinth in Jackson Park. Dedicated as a centre piece in a memorial garden on 4 Jul.65, volunteers replaced the cockpit canopy in 1995 and painted the entire aircraft in 1997, now cared for by the Canadian Historical Aviation Assoc. (C.Hist.A.A.) of Windsor, Ont. Removed from plinth in 2005. The association is planning on restoring the aircraft in a yet to be constructed museum building.

Lancaster B X FM213

Built as part of an order of 200 Lancaster B X ordered from Victory aircraft of Canada and delivered to the UK between April and August 1945. Held at 20MU it was converted to Mk10MR standard then held in storage. It was delivered to RCAF on August 21st 1946

She became known as a jinxed or rogue aircraft on the assembly line as there was always something preventing her from being accepted. After a test flight in August of 1945 by Don Rogers, Andy Gabura, Fred Lake & Tommy Thompson, FM-213 like so many others were, put into storage. The R.C.A.F. took her on in June 1946 and she was to be converted and used in a Maritime Reconnaissance/Patrol Bomber role. The conversion wasn't completed until 1951 and she went 405 Squadron, Greenwood, Nova Scotia receiving the code letters AG-J. With only 10.5 flying hours on her airframe, she was damaged during the ferry flight to 405 Squadron. This happened during a rather heavy landing at Trenton, the undercarriage collapsed and the center section was badly damaged whilst in the hands of the ferry crew.

FM-213's career nearly ended there, being considered as virtually unsalvageable due to the amount of damage. Dismantled and put into storage at de Havilland, FM-213 waited for a replacement center section, which was finally found in 1952, out west. One of the last Lancaster's to retire from the R.C.A.F., FM-213 had a long and trouble free life. In November 1963, FM-213 was finally retired and put into storage yet again, this time at Dunnville. With a life expectancy of no more than 100 hours, she had clocked up an incredible 4,392.3

A letter was sent to Paul Hellyer of the Minister of National Defense on behalf of the Goderich Chapter of the Royal Canadian Legion. A reply was sent almost straight away, the sale of FM-213 was authorized on 1st July 1964. It took over 400 man hours to upgrade FM-213 to ferry flight standards, a job done by civilian contractors. She was flown to Sky Harbour and was stored for two years whilst a display area was created. Finally, on September 15th 1968, she was put on pedestals on land dedicated by Colborne Township next to Sky Harbour. During her time on the pedestals, she had been vandalized and was deteriorating faster than the committee could restore and repair her. There she remained for several years, until being offered to the C.W.H.M. for $10,000 cash.

On July 1st 1977, FM-213 was formally handed over to the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum and taken off her pedestals. But as her engines had seized up, it was not possible for her to fly her to Mount Hope.

For two years the aircraft was continually being stripped down to enable the remaining fuselage to be airlifted this was finally done on November 5th 1979. She was then stored in the back of hangar #4 waiting for the restoration process to begin.

On March 24th, 1983 the enormous project finally started with Mr. Norm Etheridge to head the restoration project. Norm, an experienced and authorized aircraft engineer was assigned by the Department of Transport to certify the aircraft, and train others. The initial restoration crew was made up of Tim Mols, Wes Raginski, Caroline Sawyer, Michael Rossadivata & Bill Rothdeusch all of whom had just completed a one year aviation course at Centennial College in Toronto. With a Government grant the C.W.H.M. could now pay for some full-time help, little did Norm realize that it would take 10 years in all complete this project, something that some thought was impossible to do.

The working conditions were not very good. In the end of the hangar the window was the only light source, there were no overhead lights. The roof leaked a lot and there wasn't any heating. The fuselage was stripped of all paint and chromated, after any corrosion treatment was done. A crack was found in the undercarriage casting, this was replaced with a new one cast at R. Mitchell Inc of Montreal in August of 1984. The hydraulic system was repaired with new seals and they had to have new tools made to make them. This was done by the original maker of the seals, Dowty of England & Canada. All the bearings and hinge bolts in the bomb bay doors, had to be replaced. All of the timber parts had to be replaced, as did a lot of the old Perspex. The turrets were re-built and have been fitted out with replica guns, ammunition feeds and deactivated ammunition belt rounds.

As the engines were all seized replacements had to be found. A set were eventually found on KB-889 (one of the first batch of Canadian build Lancs) at Oshawa Airport, this aircraft was going to be shipped to Doug Arnold in England, but didn't need the engines. The job of overhauling the four plus a spare fell upon JRS Enterprises, at Minneapolis, Minnesota. From 1984 to 1986, whilst the engines were worked on, all of the other work related to the engines was done. The first engine arrived and was test run on April 14th 1986, the second on January 2nd 1987. It took 800 man hours of work, with two people per engine to get each engine ready for fitting onto the aircraft. The third engine was fitted by September, and the fourth by March the following year. The excitement was now mounting for a flight actually happening in 1988.

One of the biggest jobs was the painting, the external chromate paint had to be stripped, so the new enamel paint could be put on. 90 gallons of stripper and four weeks of work saw FM-213 ready for painting, this took six days to complete. They used 351 litres of paint, and 2,286 meters of masking tape, the paint added 500 Lbs to the aircraft weight.

With all of her engines in place, the first engine run in 24 years was next on the agenda. On August 10th the first engine came to life. After a few problems, all four ran for about thirty minutes. The first flight was planned for September 10th 1988, but due to slight problems this became high speed taxi tests with the actual flight put off till the Sunday. A disappointment for all those who came to see her fly but safety is always the first concern. At 13:25 September 11th 1988, FM-213 took to the air after her 24 year rest for a one hour test flight. Squadron Leader Tony Banfield, former C.O. of the R.A.F.'s B.B.M.F. was at the controls accompanied by Bob Hill, Norm Etheridge & Tim Mols.

The Inaugural Flight of the "Mynarski Memorial Lancaster" took place on September 24th 1988 with an original and complete Bomber Command crew present to witness the flight, all in their original R.C.A.F. uniforms. The crew consisted of: Larry Melling (Pilot D.F.C.), Fred Coleman (Navigator), Roy Freckleton (Bombaimer), William Grenville (Engineer), Robert Hide (Wireless operator), Fred Passmore (Air gunner), & Wilf Larsen (Air gunner).

In addition, as guests of honour, the entire Mynarski crew was present, with the exception of Andy of course, and Art de Bryne's original Mid-Upper Gunner was also present to make up a full crew. He mused the night before at the Inaugural Dinner that few crews can do that.

Accompanying them on the stage were the flight crew for the day. The Pilot, Stu Brickenden was accompanied by the Co-Pilot-Bob Hill, Flight Engineer-Norm Etheridge & George Sobering D.F.C. The C.O. of the current day 419 Squadron, L/Col Murray J Bertram presented the Lancaster pilot with the original fire axe, the actual one from the original KB-726 that P/O Andrew Mynarski had used to try help Pat Brophy escape. This fire axe was flown on the ceremonial flight and returned to 419 Squadron for safekeeping.

Since that first flight FM-213/KB-726 has added over 413 hours to her flying time, traveled many thousands of miles, and been seen at many air shows, fly pasts across the continent. She has used two sets of tyres, 19,800 gallons of fuel, had two major engine changes and now lives in a brand new multi-million-dollar facility in all her glory.

 

Information taken from http://www.nicks-cave.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/lanc/fm213.htm

Lancaster B X KB839

Built as part of an order for 300 B X by Victory Aircraft of Canada and delivered from September 1943 to March 1945 for ferrying to the United Kingdom. This aircraft was fitted with Merlin 224 engines. This aircraft served with 419 squadron (VR-A) from Jan 1945 until its delivery to Canada in June 1945 where it was converted to Mk10AR standard and served with 408 squadron. It was struck off charge in 1965 and is currently a static exhibit at Greenwood Military Aviation Museum in Nova Scotia.

Lancaster B X KB848

Built as part of an order for 300 B X by Victory Aircraft of Canada and delivered from September 1943 to March 1945 for ferrying to the United Kingdom. This aircraft was fitted with Merlin 224 engines. This aircraft served with 428 squadron from January 1945 until its return to Canada in June 1945 where it was converted to Mk 10DC standard. The aircraft was struck off charge on 3rd April 1964 and the nose section of this aircraft is displayed at the Canadian National Aviation Museum, Ottawa, Ontario.

Lancaster B X KB882

KB882 was part of the first production batch of 300 Canadian Lancaster Mk.X's built by Victory Aircraft Ltd., Malton, Ontario, Canada. She flew to England in the spring of 1945 and issued to No. 32 Maintenance Unit, 434 Squadron then taken on strength by No. 6 Group 428 "Ghost" Squadron, RAF as NA-R. Although the aircraft itself belonged to the RAF, this was an all Canadian formation.

The following is a partial record of KB882's flying time. Listed is the date, target/operation, time of day and duration.

March 15/45 - Hagen - Night - 7 hours, 5 minutes
March 31/45 - Hambourg - Day - 6 hours
April 4/45 - Merseberg - Night - 9 hours, 20 minutes
April 8/45 - Hambourg - Night - 6 hours, 5 minutes
April 9/45 - Upper Hayford - Base - 55 minutes
April 10/45 - Leipzig - Day - 8 hours, 30 minutes
April 13/45 - Kiel - Night - 6 hours, 5 minutes
April 14/45 - Church Broughton - Base - 40 minutes
April 25/45 - Wangerooge - Day - 4 hours, 50 minutes
May 6/45 - Cross country - Night - 5 hours, 15 minutes
May 14/45 - Cross country - Day - 3 hours, 45 minutes
May 24/45 - Cross country - Day - 4 hours, 40 minutes
May 29/45 - Cross country - Night - 4 hours, 35 minutes
June 1/45 - Base to St. Mawgams - 2 hours, 5 minutes
June 6/45 - St. Mawgams to Lagens - 8 hours, 42 minutes
June 9/45 - Lagens to Gander Lake - 8 hours 46 minutes
June 10/45 - Gander Lake to Yarmouth - 3 hours 17 minutes

KB882 was returned to Canada by her "Ghost" Squadron crew.

Pilot: Fl/Lt. A.L. Ross DFC, DFM
Navigator: F/O K.R. Fee DFC
W/Op: Fl/Lt. Aicken
B/A: F/O E.K. Bergy
F/E: F/O R. Loveday
Upper/G: F/O Dan Ferguson
Tail/G: F/O Bill Watson

1945-1952
Soon after its return to Canadian soil KB882 went into long term storage in Alberta. In 1952 it was ferried to A.V. Roe (Canada) for a major overhaul and modification to Mk.10P (Photographic) configuration. The most noticable alteration was the addition of a 40 inch extension to the nose section.

1952-1964
Once complete the "new" KB882 was taken on strength by 408 "Goose" Squadron based a RCAF Station Rockcliffe, Ontario. 408 Squadron Lancasters are credited with photographing the vast majority of the Canadian high Arctic in the late 1940's and 1950's. After a long and distinguished service career with the RCAF, Lancaster KB882 was honorably retired at Dunnville, Ontario.

On May 1st, 1964, the Crown Assets Disposal Corporation accepted a monetary offer from the City of Edmundston, New Brunswick, Canada for the purchase of the aircraft. Shortly after it was flown from DND 6 Repair Depot, Trenton, Ontario to Fredericton, New Brunswick where it waited for for the Edmundston site to be completed. On July 14, 1964, Captain Joseph (Pepi) DiGiacinto, pilot; Flight Sgt Derek Miller, co-pilot; Gerry Flemming, radio operator; Captain Keith Wyatt, navigator and flight Engineer, Jim Cochrane brought KB882 in from her final flight. The crew touched down at the Edmundston Municipal Airport where she has remained in good hands ever since.

Lancaster B X KB889

Built as part of an order for 300 B X by Victory Aircraft of Canada and delivered from September 1943 to March 1945 for ferrying to the United Kingdom. This aircraft was fitted with Merlin 224 engines. Serving with 428 RCAF Squadron at Middleton St. George it later returned to Canada to be used for maritime patrol and spent some time at the Age of Flight Museum at Niagara Falls. Acquired by the Imperial War Museum in 1986 it was subject to a complete rebuild between May 1987 and November 1994 to return it to its wartime condition. It is displayed in 428 Squadron colours with which it served.

Lancaster B X KB941

Built as part of an order for 300 B X by Victory Aircraft of Canada and delivered from September 1943 to March 1945 for ferrying to the United Kingdom. This aircraft was fitted with Merlin 224 engines. This aircraft sold with 420 squadron from April 1945 until its return to the RCAF in June 1945 here it was stored until 22nd January 1947 when it was struck off charge. It was put up for disposal at Claresholm AB, Alberta where it was purchased by Victor Leonhardt and the aircraft was towed by his truck along a farm road. It was broken up for spares and eventually became the property of Mr Spinks from Lethbridge, Alberta in 1986. The centre section was purchased by Charles Church Ltd in Manchester in 1990.

Lancaster B X KB944

Built as part of an order for 300 B X by Victory Aircraft of Canada and delivered from September 1943 to March 1945 for ferrying to the United Kingdom. This aircraft was fitted with Merlin 224 engines. This aircraft arrived in the UK on the 8th March 1945 and was issued to 425 squadron in May 1945 and subsequently returned to Canada in June 1945 and subsequently converted to Mk 10S standard. It spent most of the following years in stored reserve, except for a brief period with 404 Maritime Patrol Squadron at Greenwood, Nova Scotia in 1952. In 1964 the RCAF refurbished this aircraft and placed it in the Force’s historical aircraft collection. The aircraft is currently displayed in the National Aviation Museum, Rockcliffe, Ontario, where it is displayed as KB944/NA-P/Winnie.

Lancaster B X KB976

Built as part of an order for 300 B X by Victory Aircraft of Canada and delivered from September 1943 to March 1945 for ferrying to the United Kingdom. This aircraft was fitted with Merlin 224 engines. The aircraft was delivered to 32 MU  at St. Athan and subsequently issued to 405 Sqn, RCAF in May 1945 as LQ-K. It was returned to Canada  on 17th June 1945 and was issued to 664 (Heavy Bomber) Wing, Greenwood, Nova Scotia for Tiger Force. Delivered to No. 2 Air Command in June 1956 it was stored at unspecified location, then converted to Mk 10 AR standard and issued to 408 Sqn(P), RCAF as MN-976, it was finally struck off charge on the 26th May 1964. On 1st May 1964 it flew the last flight for 408(P) Sqn, RCAF from Downsview, Ontario as part of the retirement ceremony.

Purchased by Dr. Johnson, Calgary, Alberta for Air Museum of Canada, Calgary, Alberta. Registered as CF-AMD North-western Air Lease, St. Albert, Alberta, 1969-1973. Registered as CF-TQC. Conversion to fire tanker started but not complete. Sold to Sir W.J.D. Roberts for the Strathallan Collection as G-BOCH water bomber, Sept. 24, 1974-1987. Delivered to Strathallan by air from Edmonton, June 11, 1975 (reported to have be painted orange for this flight). On display at Strathallan Collection, Purchased by Charles Church Ltd, Manchester, 1987-1990 (Church later killed in a Spitfire accident), trucked to BAE Woodford for restoration to airworthy, Apr. 9, 1987, but was badly damaged by hanger collapse, Woodward, Aug. 12, 1987 and resulted in the rebuild being abandoned. Arrived dismantled Bedford, Nov. 1988 along with sections of Lancaster KB994 and Lincoln RF342 for planned restoration by Cranfield Institute of Technology. Stored 1988-1990. Sold to Doug Arnold, Warbirds Of GB Ltd, Biggin Hill, Aug. 1990-1992 for planned rebuild, using KB994 & Lincoln RF342. Sold to Kermit Weeks, Weeks Air Museum/Fantasy of Flight, Polk City, FL, 1992-2002 stored with planed restoration in future.

In October 2002 the mid fuselage section of KB976 at Sandtoft, balance of aircraft appears to remain in Florida.
The parts of all 3 aircraft then went on a magical mystery tour including Biggin Hill, North Weald and ending up at Sandtoft. Currently, Kermit Weeks has a complete Lancaster airframe at Polk City, Florida which officially has the identity KB976, while the Lincoln is in Australia (or at least on it's way to a museum there).
Still with me?
So, exactly what do we have here? My guess is that this is the genuine forward fuselage of KB976 which was damaged in the Woodford hangar collapse making it unairworthy, but it is perfectly suitable for static display. The Kermit Weeks KB976 (I suspect) includes the nose section of KB994, combined with the airframe of KB976.
Anyway, back to Brooklands.
When we visited in June 2011, the Port side was in RAF Bomber Command markings as 'Our Beautiful Babe' while the starboard side remains in genuine RCAF colours.
Whatever the history, it's great to see this airframe finally back on display again!

Lancaster B X KB994

Built as part of an order for 300 B X by Victory Aircraft of Canada and delivered from September 1943 to March 1945 for ferrying to the United Kingdom. This aircraft was fitted with Merlin 224 engines. Issued to 408 squadron and subsequently returned to Canada in June 1945, aircraft remained stored until struck off charge on 22nd January 1947. It was up for disposal at Claresholm AB in Alberta and was purchased by Victor Leonhardt of Drumheller, Alberta and towed by road and broken up for parts. The fuselage was moved to a farm at Pigeon Lake, Edmonton where it remained from 1963 to 1984. It was briefly under the ownership of Neil Menzies when it came under the ownership of the 408th Tactical Helicopter Squadron Museum at CFB Edmonton in 1984, it was recovered by helicopter on July 15th 1984 and restoration commenced. In 1988 it was purchased by Charles Church Ltd in Manchester where it remained until 1990 when Doug Arnold of Warbirds GB Ltd purchased it to be used in the rebuild of KB976/G-BCOH. On the move again this time to Aces High Ltd at North Weald on 3rd August 1993 and registered as G-BVBP, here it was stored in a dismantled condition at Biggin Hill. David Copley of the Imperial Aviation Group at North Coates held the aircraft from 1997 to 2001 as a restoration project. In 2001 the aircraft was with David Arnold of Flying A Services at North Weald and the forward fuselage was under restoration. Latest information is that it is in private ownership at Marham, Norfolk in June 2008.

 

Lancaster B X KB999

Built as part of an order for 300 B X by Victory Aircraft of Canada and delivered from September 1943 to March 1945 for ferrying to the United Kingdom. This aircraft was fitted with Merlin 224 engines. Along with many other aircraft this Lancaster was returned to Canada in June 1945 and subsequently served with 405 squadron. It was lost on a mission on 22nd August 1953 and although still visible on a sand bank for many years it is now believed that this aircraft is now lost. For more detailed information go to: -

http://www.dunrobincastle.com/Nose_Art/Stories/Lancaster_KB999_Part2.htm

Lancaster B I NF920

This aircraft was one of 400 BI aircraft ordered from Armstrong Whitworth Aircraft (Baginton) in the range NF906 to NG503 and were delivered between July 1944 and January 1945. This aircraft was delivered in early August 1944 to 617 squadron. Easy Elsie participated in a bombing raid against Tirpitz during WW2 and had to make a forced landing near Porjus in northern Sweden after sustaining severe AA damage. Crew survived but aircraft was beyond repair after the landing and the fact that the crew torched her.

On the 29th October 1944 the aircraft took off at 0114 from RAF Lossiemouth. It was part of a force of 37 aircraft - 37 Lancasters - 18 from 9 Sqn, 18 from 617 Sqn, 1 Lancaster film unit from 463 Sqn - tasked to attack the Battleship Tirpitz in the Norwegian port of Tromso. With an approximate round trip of 2250 miles, modifications were required to all of the Lancasters. These included the removal of the mid-upper turrets and other non-essential equipment, plus the installation of additional fuel tanks giving a capacity of 2406 gallons. Although early reports from a weather reconnaissance Mosquito showed that the target area was clear, but the time the force had arrived cloud had covered the Battleship. This resulted in all 32 aircraft dropping their Tallboys on an estimated position and no direct hits were achieved. 1 aircraft, 2.63 percent of the force were lost - 1 Lancaster. The aircraft is reported to have attempted six bombing runs over the target before releasing its bomb, damaged by flak the pilot set course for Sweden and crash-landed in a bog near Projus, Sweden. Although F/O Carey is reported to have received an unspecified injury,  all of the crew survived the landing and were temporarily interned by the Swedish authorities before being returned to England.

 

As of 1997 the remains of the aircraft could still be found at the crash site.

Lancaster B VII FE NX611

Lancaster B VII FE NX622

Lancaster B VII FE NX664

Lancaster B VII FE NX665

Lancaster B I FE PA474

Lancaster B I RA502

This aircraft was built as part of an order for 250 Lancasters ordered from Metropolitan Vickers in August 1943 of which 201 aircraft were built and delivered from December 1944 to April 1945 as 121 Lancaster BI with Merlin 24 engines initially installed. The aircraft was delivered to 550 squadron as BQ-Z but was lost during the evening of 1st February 1945 when it collided with NG202 over France. In 1998 three tons of wreckage was excavated and is currently on display at the Musee de l'Aeronautique, Nancy, France.

Back to top

Home | Lancaster | Bibliography Sea King Full Listing